I spoke to The Guardian Fashion desk and discussed the impact of TV character’s wardrobe on the viewing public. I also revealed how the styling work of Ayanna Kimani the TV series ‘Insecure’ allowed me to channel my inner Molly at work. 

The fashion psychologist Shakaila Forbes-Bell understands the lure of a fictional character’s look. She identified with one of the central characters, Molly, on Issa Rae’s American comedy drama series Insecure – “a very powerful woman, very true to her culture and roots – as a black woman I really identify with that”. Forbes-Bell soon found herself on a “what this character wore” website. “I thought, ‘I need to find this’. I followed her stylist on Instagram.” When, in line with the character, she on occasion dressed in a more tailored way, it worked: “I definitely felt like I embodied that confidence.”
Even when characters seem a far cry from anyone we know, borrowing an aesthetic becomes an attempt to borrow some of their traits. 

Comer’s character may enjoy killing people, but she also has something many women more typically aspire to. “We don’t want to fade into the background any more,” says Forbes-Bell. With her clothes, Villanelle is making the point that she refuses to go unheard. Don a frou frou pink frilly frock such as the standout Villanelle outfit from the first Killing Eve series and you might just borrow a slice of her up-and-at-them spirit. “The easiest way to take charge is through your clothing,” says Forbes-Bell.

Read the rest of my comment and the piece by Ellie Violet Bramley in its entirety here

Author

Shakaila Forbes-Bell is a Fashion Psychologist and writer who has been featured in Marie Claire UK, i-D, Who What Wear, All Walks Beyond the Catwalk, Fashion Bomb Daily, The Voice Newspaper, Gal-Dem, Black Matters US and more.

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